Andrew Que Sites list Photos
Projects Contact
Main
   While it is hard to see, the faucet in this picture is spraying a stream of water all over.  This happen regularly due to lime buildup on the diffuser.  I found the best way to deal with this problem is to take apart the diffuser and soak the parts in acid for several seconds.  I normally have to do this about every 8 months.
   The spring play, Unidentified Human Remains and the True Nature of Love, for which I am doing lights for is almost as light driven as Samuel Beckett's Play.  I had 43 light cues in the first three pages.  It took me about 6 hours to finish the first 13 pages of cues, and tonight was my first test at seeing how the lights worked with the cast.
   My script ended up being out of order, so my 13 pages of cues actually had a break in the middle.  But other then that, the light cues went well.  They happen quite rapidly in places, but I seem to have them down fairly well.  It might end up being pretty neat when it comes show time!
   While hanging lights for the play, I found I could not get a good overhead light for a location on stage from the fixed electric battons.  My solution: create an other electric batton.  What I did was use some very long extension cords, and let them dangle off the end of the batton.  I placed two lights on this batton, thus two cords.  They are kept on by some clamps I found, and then dangle off the edge of the batton.  I used two floor plugs to feed power, and two more extension cords.  Then I placed a light post under the batton and ran the extension cords from the floor up the post.  These two cords meet with the ones from the batton.  This way, should the batton rise above the length the extension cords can reach, they will simply unplug.  The result, an other electric batton.

March 23, 2011

The River

Ashley and James

Ashley and James

   The Rock River where I live overflows the banks and floods at 9 feet, which it is forecast to do (again) by Friday.  Being early spring, it doesn't surprise me that the river is high.  In fact I'm use to noticing the river being high, but I found this interesting...
   The National Weather Service has kept records of the height of the river since 1914.  Flood stage is considered 9 feet.  Since 1914, this has happened 46 times.  If we were to look at decades for number of times the river has reached at least 9 feet, it would look like this:
1910-1920 6
1920-1930 4
1930-1940 4
1940-1950 4
1950-1960 4
1960-1970 1
1970-1980 4
1980-1990 4
1990-2000 6
2000-2010 9
Notice that the average between 1920 and 1990 are 4 floods a decade.  But starting in the 1990ies, flooding has increased in regularity.  The natural first question is, what happened?  Why the increase in flooding?  Well, the same size is quite small: 10 decades to work with. So this may be related to how measurements are being made.  However, I think something may have changed, and my thoughts are it may be related to damming, or additional drainage system that now contribute more water to the river. 
   The Rock River is around 285 miles long, and has at least 100 miles of run before it reaches Beloit.  There are several cities upstream: Janesville, Watertown, Jefferson, Fort Atkinson just to name a few, and each of these cities are growing.  So it may be that we should expect more flooding in years to come.
   Went to school today (despite spring break) to work on some homework, and do some light work in the theater.  Pictured is my normal location in the library.
   For light work today I did a lot of what I should have done the first day.  I mapped out the locations of the various plugs available on the above stage electrical battens.  I also mapped out where lights would be mapped (sub-mastered) on the light board.  Progress is being made, but there is a lot of work left to do.